Dum Spiro Spero

Karen. 23. College student from NJ studying a BS & MS in Occupational Therapy. Ask if you dare.

This blog will contain references to PTSD, trauma, Eating Disorders (in recovery from anorexia), DID (Dissociative Identity Disorder), ASL, crocheting, baking, a smattering of fandoms, advocating for those with special needs and other miscellaneous subjects that strike my fancy or anyone else in our system!


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Using my ‘In Case of Emergency’ playlist. 

Reblogged from atlanticinfocus
atlanticinfocus:

From Photos of the Week: 10/11-10/17, one of 35 photos. Blind student Marina Gimaraes, of the Association of Ballet and Arts for the Blind, warms up backstage before performing “Corsario e Paquitas” during celebrations marking Brazil’s Children’s Day at the Italo Theater in Sao Paulo on October 12, 2014. The Association was founded by Brazilian ballerina and physiotherapist Fernanda Bianchini in 1995, when she decided to teach classical ballet to the blind for free. Since then, her classes have been opened to the deaf and mute, and even to children and youths with other handicaps. Bianchini says that the school’s main goal for their students is for them to improve their posture, balance, spatial sense and self-esteem, in addition to breaking barriers and prejudices about people with handicaps. (Reuters/Nacho Doce)

atlanticinfocus:

From Photos of the Week: 10/11-10/17, one of 35 photos. Blind student Marina Gimaraes, of the Association of Ballet and Arts for the Blind, warms up backstage before performing “Corsario e Paquitas” during celebrations marking Brazil’s Children’s Day at the Italo Theater in Sao Paulo on October 12, 2014. The Association was founded by Brazilian ballerina and physiotherapist Fernanda Bianchini in 1995, when she decided to teach classical ballet to the blind for free. Since then, her classes have been opened to the deaf and mute, and even to children and youths with other handicaps. Bianchini says that the school’s main goal for their students is for them to improve their posture, balance, spatial sense and self-esteem, in addition to breaking barriers and prejudices about people with handicaps. (Reuters/Nacho Doce)

(via feelinghomeonstage)

Reblogged from yellowcrayonwillow-archive
Reblogged from ghostielevi

ami-angelwings:

profoundboner:

bpdlevi:

"you’re obsessed with your mental illness"

i know right? it’s almost like it impacts every part of my life

"it’s all in your head"

I know right? it’s almost like it’s a mental illness

"why do you let it affect you and stop you from being able to do things?"

I know right? It’s almost like it’s an ACTUAL ILLNESS

(Source: ghostielevi, via wanderingstrider)

Reblogged from dotty-literati

always-tuesdays:

The majestic Dumbo Octopus (x)

(Source: dotty-literati, via the-bucky-barnes)

Reblogged from selfcareafterrape
selfcareafterrape:

[Image Description: ‘Talking about Trauma (to others)’ ]
Before Hand:
Telling others about our traumas can be scary. In this post we talked about different ways to talk about trauma but not about how to talk to others about it. Make sure you take some time to amp yourself for telling them, and also to prepare for what happens if things go wrong. Here is a post talking about what to do if someone doesn’t believe you.
There is always a chance that someone will say something victim blaming or be invalidating- and it’s extremely important that you know how you’ll respond and how you’ll take care of yourself after wards if that’s the case. Consider writing down the possible bad responses on a piece of paper/in a document- and writing out what you’ll say in turn. Or if you have a close friend who already knows- see if they’re willing to role play with you both good and negative outcomes.
When considering coming out about what happened- there are a few things you want to look at.
The Who:
Who do you want to tell? 
Your parents? Your teachers? Your boss? Friends? Other family? A mentor? A therapist? A doctor?
Talking to each of these people is a slightly different experience.  Even if you do decide to talk to everyone about it- you might approach them in different ways and tell them different details. That’s okay.
The How:
How are you going to tell them?
In an email? In a text message? By bringing them to an event where you speak? In a one on one conversation? In a small group? In a note/letter?
Different ways have different pro’s and con’s.  For instance telling in an email/text message/letter means you don’t have to be there when they read this. This can feel very impersonal to the person receiving the information- but your first concern should be you. If you leave it like that- you can also leave other materials that might help them understand how to help you better/that you want them to understand before they speak to you. This can held stunt some of the impulsive ‘but how do you know/what were you wearing’ and other such comments that people seem so fond of making.
The When:
Sometimes what happened just comes stumbling out but it’s usually better to have some sort of plan. The when can be very important when it comes to the responses that you receive from whoever you’re telling.
In general it’s better to not tell someone if you’re in the middle of a fight or if you know that they’re extremely stressed out. Sometimes there is no other option- and that’s okay, but in general.. neutral times are best to talk about this.
Also, privacy is a thing you might want to account for. Somewhere where you don’t have to worry about other’s overhearing and also that it’s quiet enough that the person you’re communicating with will hear you.
The What:
What do you want to tell them? How much detail do you want to go into? Don’t be afraid to set boundaries. You are allowed to say ‘I am telling you this much but I don’t feel comfortable answering questions about it’ or clearly outlining what you are willing to talk about. What you tell is up to you. Be firm if they try to cross the boundary ‘Look, I don’t want to tell you that. This is hard for me as is and you are being disrespectful by pressing the matter’.
Decide before hand what you need them to know. Do they need to know details? Do they need to know that this is why you’re doing xyz? 
The Why:
What do you hope to gain by telling them?
For a doctor- it might be that you’re asking them to be slow with you and understand that you’ve been through trauma.
For a friend- you may be telling them because you need someone to tell- or you might be doing it because you need a change in their behavior.
If so, consider having resources already on hand that you can show them that will help them work with you to make the relationship a healthier place for the both of you. Consider looking through the fos tag or finding articles/blog posts for other individuals.
After the fact:
Take time to reflect and participate in some self-care. Even if everything went amazing, chances are you’re feeling a little drained. Take the time to congratulate yourself for having the courage to speak out- even if it didn’t go the best. By taking time to take care of ourselves afterwards- we increase the chances that we’ll be willing to do it again in the future.
Take care of yourselves today, okay?

selfcareafterrape:

[Image Description: ‘Talking about Trauma (to others)’ ]

Before Hand:

Telling others about our traumas can be scary. In this post we talked about different ways to talk about trauma but not about how to talk to others about it. Make sure you take some time to amp yourself for telling them, and also to prepare for what happens if things go wrong. Here is a post talking about what to do if someone doesn’t believe you.

There is always a chance that someone will say something victim blaming or be invalidating- and it’s extremely important that you know how you’ll respond and how you’ll take care of yourself after wards if that’s the case. Consider writing down the possible bad responses on a piece of paper/in a document- and writing out what you’ll say in turn. Or if you have a close friend who already knows- see if they’re willing to role play with you both good and negative outcomes.

When considering coming out about what happened- there are a few things you want to look at.

The Who:

Who do you want to tell? 

Your parents? Your teachers? Your boss? Friends? Other family? A mentor? A therapist? A doctor?

Talking to each of these people is a slightly different experience.  Even if you do decide to talk to everyone about it- you might approach them in different ways and tell them different details. That’s okay.

The How:

How are you going to tell them?

In an email? In a text message? By bringing them to an event where you speak? In a one on one conversation? In a small group? In a note/letter?

Different ways have different pro’s and con’s.  For instance telling in an email/text message/letter means you don’t have to be there when they read this. This can feel very impersonal to the person receiving the information- but your first concern should be you. If you leave it like that- you can also leave other materials that might help them understand how to help you better/that you want them to understand before they speak to you. This can held stunt some of the impulsive ‘but how do you know/what were you wearing’ and other such comments that people seem so fond of making.

The When:

Sometimes what happened just comes stumbling out but it’s usually better to have some sort of plan. The when can be very important when it comes to the responses that you receive from whoever you’re telling.

In general it’s better to not tell someone if you’re in the middle of a fight or if you know that they’re extremely stressed out. Sometimes there is no other option- and that’s okay, but in general.. neutral times are best to talk about this.

Also, privacy is a thing you might want to account for. Somewhere where you don’t have to worry about other’s overhearing and also that it’s quiet enough that the person you’re communicating with will hear you.

The What:

What do you want to tell them? How much detail do you want to go into? Don’t be afraid to set boundaries. You are allowed to say ‘I am telling you this much but I don’t feel comfortable answering questions about it’ or clearly outlining what you are willing to talk about. What you tell is up to you. Be firm if they try to cross the boundary ‘Look, I don’t want to tell you that. This is hard for me as is and you are being disrespectful by pressing the matter’.

Decide before hand what you need them to know. Do they need to know details? Do they need to know that this is why you’re doing xyz? 

The Why:

What do you hope to gain by telling them?

For a doctor- it might be that you’re asking them to be slow with you and understand that you’ve been through trauma.

For a friend- you may be telling them because you need someone to tell- or you might be doing it because you need a change in their behavior.

If so, consider having resources already on hand that you can show them that will help them work with you to make the relationship a healthier place for the both of you. Consider looking through the fos tag or finding articles/blog posts for other individuals.

After the fact:

Take time to reflect and participate in some self-care. Even if everything went amazing, chances are you’re feeling a little drained. Take the time to congratulate yourself for having the courage to speak out- even if it didn’t go the best. By taking time to take care of ourselves afterwards- we increase the chances that we’ll be willing to do it again in the future.

Take care of yourselves today, okay?

(via multiple-us)

Reblogged from alexandrarickman

Reblogged from cheers-to-those-teenage-yearss
Reblogged from myloish

(Source: myloish, via spooky-amygdala)

Reblogged from atheatrething
  • First watching Rent: ..... What are they SAYING?!
  • Watching Rent now: TO DAYS OF INSPIRATION PLAYING HOOKEY MAKING SOMETHING OUT OF NOTHING THE NEED TO EXPRESS TO COMMUNICATE TO GOING AGAINST THE GRAIN GOING INSANE GOING MAAAAADDDD